Health Science I

Health Science I Honors Syllabus
 Anatomy & Physiology (Course #HU405)
Teacher: Nann A. Hatcher, RN  ADN, BSN, MHSA
919-705-6060
nannhatcher@wcps.org
2nd period planning Fall Semester 2017

 

Course Textbook: Body Structure & Function 10th edition
Course Description: This course focuses on human anatomy, physiology and human body diseases and disorders, and biomedical therapies.  Students will learn about health care careers within the context of human body systems.  Projects, teamwork, and demonstrations serve as instructional strategies that reinforce the curriculum content.  English language arts and science are reinforced in this course. Biology and Health Team Relations classes are recommended as good preparation for this course. Successful completion of Health Sciences 1 and Health Sciences 2 is a prerequisite for Nursing Fundamentals.

Enhanced Description:  The Honors Health Science I curriculum addresses all of the essential standards for Health Science I as found in the NC CTE Course blueprint. In addition to these essential standards, the Health Science I Honors student will expand their knowledge of the human body through complex assignments. The goal of the honors curriculum is to increase the student’s understanding of how the anatomy and physiology of each body system is impacted by disease and the aging process. The honors level students will be expected to not only study each body system more deeply through extensive reading and research; they will be constantly challenged to analyze the interconnectedness of the body systems with projects and research. Students wishing to pursue medicine will have a greater understanding of anatomy and physiology thereby creating a student who is more successful and more likely to succeed and progress through the health science pathways.

 This course is offered at the junior and senior levels. It is recommended for students who want to prepare for further study in a health care career. It is offered in a one period block, five days a week. It is one elective credit toward graduation.

Articulation Course Credit can be earned through Wayne Community College.
See Ms. Hatcher for details.

 Course Outline, Competencies, and Objectives:
Unit A: Human Body’s Support, Movement, and Use of Nutrients
1.00 Understand the body’s systems of support & movement
1.01 Remember the structural organization
1.02 Remember the structures of the Skeletal System
1.03 Understand the functions and disorders of the Skeletal System
1.04 Remember the structures of the Muscular System
1.05 Understand the functions and disorders of the Muscular System
2.00 Understand the body’s use of nutrients
2.01 Remember the structures of the Circulatory System
2.02 Understand the functions and disorders of the Circulatory System
2.03 Remember the structures of the Lymphatic System
2.04 Understand the functions and disorders of the Lymphatic System
2.05 Remember the structures of the Respiratory System
2.06 Understand the functions and disorders of the Respiratory System
2.07 Remember the structures of the Digestive System
2.08 Understand the functions and disorders of the Digestive System

Unit B: Human Body’s Communication & Hormone Control Systems
3.00 Understand the body’s communication systems
3.01 Remember the structures of the Nervous System
3.02 Understand the functions and disorders of the Nervous System
3.03 Remember the structures of the Sensory System
3.04 Understand the functions and disorders of the Sensory System
3.05 Remember the structures of the Integumentary System
3.06 Understand the functions and disorders of the Integumentary System
4.00 Understands the body’s systems of hormone control
4.01 Remember the structures of the Urinary System
4.02 Understand the functions and disorders of the Urinary System
4.03 Remember the structures of the Endocrine System
4.04 Understand the functions and disorders of the Endocrine System
4.05 Remember the structures of the Reproductive System
4.06 Understand the functions and disorders of the Reproductive ystem

Honors Projects:

1. PBS=Public Service Announcement
2. Body Systems Scrapbook for each unit objectives
3. Directional Video
4. Model & Trifold Poster

Materials Needed:
Hard cover three ring notebook
Notebook paper and dividers
Writing utensils: Pen (Black ink only)

 Grading Scale:  
*First nine weeks: 40%                       *Classwork/Participation: 10%                                  A=90-100
*Second nine weeks: 40%                  *Written Unit Test: 30%                                            B=80-89
*Final Written Exam: 10%                   *Projects/Portfolios: 30%                                         C=70-79
*Final Clinical Exam: 10%                   * Clinical/Skills: 30%                                                D=60-69
                                                                                                                                             F= Below 60      

 Evaluation Methods:

You will have a comprehensive test following completion of each objective. It will be announced in class and also written on the board in advance of the actual test date. You will also be given a study guide/review before each test is given. You will be graded on participation in class discussions and projects.

Course Requirements:
1.  You are expected to be in class. This class covers a lot of information and it is difficult to keep up when you are absent. If you need help, please let me know, I will be glad to tutor you and I am able to meet with you before school or after to help you make-up work.
2.  You are expected to submit all required work on time.
3.  If you are absent on a day when a test is given, a make-up test must be taken within five (5) student days upon your return to school. You have five (5) student days upon your return to school to turn in any missed classwork, projects, and clinical/skills assignments. Failure to comply with these requirements will result a zero for your grade.
4.  Students having more than six (6) unexcused absences during this class period will be in immediate jeopardy of not receiving credit for this course.
5.  Students must be present a minimum of one (1) hour to be counted present for a class period.

 CLASSROOM RULES     

1.      No cell phones on during lecture. 

2.      No gum or food in classroom. 

3.      No profanity or inappropriate language in classroom. 

4.      Be in class each day. (Aim for 100% attendance) 

5.      No sleeping in class. (EVER) 

6.      Show respect in class (To everyone, at all times) 

7.      Follow WCPS & SWHS rules.      

 I encourage all students to join and actively participate in our student organization, HOSA (Health Occupations Student of America).  I believe it is a growing experience for students, enhancing your leadership skills and self-esteem!!

Honors Projects Instructions:

Honors Project #1: Directional Video

Learning Objectives:  Develop a video to show how directional terms are used to describe locations within the body
Academic Standards: Structural Organization (Recognize body planes, directional terms, quadrants, and cavities)

 Essential Questions

  • How is the human body organized?
  • What are the structural components of the body?
  • How does the body’s structural organization relate to its support and movement?

 Procedure:

  1. Divide into groups of 3 or 4.
  2. READ THE RUBRIC you are generally graded on design, creativity, correct content, complete content, narration
  3. Must be submitted in video format (Examples: mp4, mov, avi)
  4. Must be submitted via EDMODO or a pre-approved format
  5. Come up with a list of the all of the directional terms that need to be in their video.
  6. Your group will need to make a 5 minute video that demonstrates their knowledge of how all directional terms.
    1. First your group needs to decide on a format for their video: Example- The students could be leading a dance class where each of the terms are used in the dances.
    2. Then the students need to write a script that includes all of the terms and correctly demonstrates them on the video.  The script needs to go in order of the video.  For example:  If your video shows the transverse plane first that should follow true to the script.  If script and video are out points will be deducted. 
    3. The final task is that the students need to videotape their movie and later show it to the class.

  Rubric: Directional Video

Student Names: __________________________________ Date: ___________________ 



Exemplary

10 points



Solid

7-9 points


Developing
6-4 points



Needs Attention

4-0 points



Visual Design



Assignment is attractive, excellent visual design, and professional, and organized.


Excellent graphics are utilized to support the content and make it flow easy



Assignment has basic attractiveness and has a good visual design with an organized layout.


Good graphics help support the content.



Assignment has limited appeal missing some visual design and poorly organized


Too many or too few graphics are used and lack support of the content.



Assignment is messy, contains poor design, not organized


Graphics are not present at all or if present, distract from the content



Expressiveness



VIDEO is extremely creative, engaging, and informative and highly likely to be appreciated by the target audience.



Video is somewhat creative, engaging, and informative and likely to be appreciated by the target audience.



VIDEO is poorly creative, engaging, or informative, or it is unlikely to appeal to the target audience.



VIDEO is not at all engaging, creative, informative or will not be appreciated by the target audience.


Comprehension of

Subject Matter



All content is accurate and complete and communicates a complete understanding of the topic.



Most of the content is accurate and shows mastery of the topic.



Content shows some flaws and omissions and illustrates only partial knowledge of the topic.



Much of the content is inaccurate and confusing and communicates very little understanding of the topic.



Narration



Narration is highly clear, animated, and spoken at an easily understandable pace.



Narration is usually clear, animated, and spoken at an understandable pace.



Narration is unclear or slightly confusing at times, and the pace is either too rushed or too slow at times to be easily understood.



Narration is unclear or delivered without enthusiasm, or pace is too fast to be understood.



Vocabulary




Exhibits complete use of vocabulary pertaining to objectives & standard


Exhibits most vocabulary pertaining to objective & standard


Exhibits minimal vocabulary pertaining to objective & standard


Exhibits a lack of vocabulary pertaining to objective & standard

Total Points

50points

&

grading comments






 

 


Honors Project #2: Scrapbook

Learning Objectives: Create a “Human Body Systems” scrapbook illustrating structures, functions, disorders, and treatments of each major human body system.

 Academic Standards: Human Body Systems (Understand and remember the functions, structures, disorders, and treatments of each human body system)

 Essential Questions

  • What are the structural components of each body system?
  • What are the functions of each body system?
  •  What disorders and treatments effect each body system?
  • How does one body system rely on another to perform its functions

 What to Include:

The following will serve as a guide in the construction of each body system scrapbook:

 I. General Information

        AWhat are the structures of the system?
           B.  What are the functions of the system?
           C.  Pictures/Illustrations to demonstrate system
           D.  What are the disorders of the system?
                 a) Include a brief description of the disorder
                 b) Signs and symptoms
                 c) What are the causes of the condition (if known)?
                 d) Who is most affected by it? How many people does it affect in the United States
                     and/or the world? How
 often?
                 e) What is the prognosis?
                 f) What are the health complications associated with this disorder?
                 g) How does the system rely on another system to perform its functions?

 II. Current Treatments

  A. What are the most common and current treatments for
       the disorders?
  B. How effective are the common treatments? Do they have
       side effects?
  C. What are the latest medical advances or research about
      the disorder?

 III. Prevent and Management   

   A.  What if anything can be done to prevent the disorder?
   B.  What specific advice is there for people to prevent
         this disorder?

 

Recommended Resources to use
for completing your scrapbook

You’ll want to find the most current information about the disorders you’re researching, as well as recent news about treatments that are in the pipeline or being researched. It’s likely you’ll need to use different kinds of websites to find the different kinds of information.

Health information websites

Use these websites as places to begin looking for the most current information about a disorder and the treatments now available:

  • Medline Plus http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/healthtopics.html
  • This is a great place to begin your research. Find your condition by using the alphabet letters at the top. The page for each condition contains reliable links to background information, latest news, symptoms and treatments, and other useful information. If you feel ambitious, follow the links to clinical trials. You will find descriptions of treatments currently being tested on humans. These may include complicated language, but many of them you will be able to understand.
  • You will also find links to organizations that help people who have the condition. These organizational sites are also good sources of information about the latest news and how patients deal with their conditions.
    • Mayo Clinic http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/DiseasesIndex/DiseasesIndex
  • The section for each disease/disorder includes pages describing symptoms, causes, and treatments. Click on the Resources tab for links to other reliable websites with further information.
    • WebMD http://www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/health-topics/default.htm
  • The page for each condition offers good background information about symptoms, causes, and treatments. Be sure to look at the list of related links at the end of the article.
  • Medical news websites that might be relevant to the condition you’re researching.
    • Medical News Today http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/
  • Use the search function to find articles from throughout the world that relate to your condition.
    • Science Daily http://www.sciencedaily.com/news/health_medicine/
  • News site that reports on current research and also has some background information material. Search for your topic on the list on the left, or use the search box at the top.
    • Harvard Health Blog http://www.health.harvard.edu/blog/
    • Center for Disease Control
    • National Institute of Health

 Rubric: SCRAPBOOK PROJECT 

 

Exemplary 10

Solid 9-7

Developing 6-5

Needs Attention 4-0

 

Visual Design

 

Scrapbook is attractive, excellent visual design and professional and organized


Exhibits excellent use of graphics to support the content and make it flow easy

 

Has basic attractiveness and has a good visual design with an organized layout

 

Good graphics help support the content

 

 

Has limited appeal missing some visual design and poorly organized.

 

Too many or too few graphics are used and lack support of the content

 

 

Is messy, contains poor design, not organized

 

Graphics are not present at all or if present, distract from the content

 

Comprehension of Subject

Matter

 

All content is accurate and completed according to instructions

 

 

Most of the content is accurate. Most content is present in paper according to instructions

 

 

Content shows some incorrect flaws and omissions according to the instructions

.

 

Much of the content is inaccurate and incomplete

 

 

Evidence &

Examples

 

All of the evidence and

examples (facts, statistics, and descriptions) are specific and relevant.

 

 

Most of the evidence and examples are specific and relevant.

 

At least one piece of evidence or one example is relevant.

 

Evidence and examples are not relevant.

 

Content

Organization/

Flow

 

Content is clearly

organized, with a logical flow of connected ideas and effective transitions.

 

Content is organized,

and most ideas are well connected with effective transitions.

 

Ideas are sound, but the

content is not well organized and needs more effective transitions.

 

Content is extremely disorganized. The transitions between ideas are unclear or

nonexistent.

 

 

Mechanics

 

No grammatical, spelling,

or punctuation errors. All

sentences are well constructed and vary in structure.

 

 

 

Few grammatical, spelling, or punctuation errors. Most sentences are well constructed, with some variation in sentence structure.

 

Some grammatical, spelling, or punctuation errors. Most sentences are well-constructed, with little variation in sentence structure.

 

Many grammatical, spelling, or punctuation errors. Most sentences are poorly constructed.

Total Points & Score & Additional Comments:

___________________________________________________________________________

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Honor Project #3: Instructions on PSA Announcement

 Group Assignment with 2-3 members per group (no more than 3 due to role assignment)

 Tips for Writing a PSA

  • Decide who your audience is. For example, are people in a certain age group most at risk?
  • Give a call to action. What do you want your audience to do?
  • Make it relevant to your audience. Why should they pay attention?
  • Make sure to include the relevant information. Who? What? When? Where? Why? How?
  • Use emotion to get your audience involved and  keep your language simple and vivid.
  • Make every word count. A one-minute PSA script may only be around 100‒150 words long.

     Thinking about Your PSA Script 

  1. What points or specific details do you definitely want to include in your PSA?
  2. What kind of tone do you want to use? Are you trying to scare the audience? Encourage them? Cheer them up? Make them laugh? Surprise them? Shock them?
  3. What is your call to action? What do you want someone to do because of your PSA? (Start exercising? Stop smoking? Get tested? See a doctor?) 

Outline Your PSA

This isn’t a script and you don’t have to stick to it exactly when you create your final PSA, but it will help you get started if you can write down the key points you want to include and put them in logical order.

Our Opening

Things to think about:

  • What can you say to get the audience’s attention?
  • How will you set the tone?
  • How common is your condition? Will the audience know somebody who has it? Is there a good chance the audience member might get this condition?
  • Are there any startling facts or surprising statistics you found in your research that you think people need to hear? 

Key Points to Include

Things to think about:

  • What is your call to action? Have you made it clear what you want people to do and why they should do it?
  • What argument can you make to persuade people? Do you have facts? Emotional appeals? Scary statistics? 

    Our Conclusion

    Things to think about:

  • What is your call to action? Make sure to emphasize it as your PSA comes to an end.
  • Do you have a final image or thought that is really powerful and might persuade somebody? If you haven’t already used it, make sure to include it in your conclusion.

    PLANNER: Creating Your PSA  

    Directions: Use this resource to help you divide up the work so that each group member plays a role in producing your PSA. Once you have assigned roles, read the section for your role and make note of any questions you have so you can get them answered.

    The Roles

    When creating your PSA, each of you needs to take on a specific job. Read over the roles described below and think about one or two roles that you think you would enjoy and could do well.

     Visual designer: puts together the slides that will accompany your narration; chooses (or creates) images and text

  • Audio technician: manages the recording of the voiceover for the PSA; adds sound effects or music if appropriate
  • Scriptwriter: writes the script for the PSA, using the outline; makes sure the PSA is the correct length

Explanation of Duties
Visual Designer

Your job is to create the PowerPoint slides that will be on the screen during your group’s recorded narration. You want to design approximately three slides that change at key moments during your narration. Here are some things to think about:

  • Colors

What colors do you want to use? Dark or strong colors like black or red can grab the audience’s attention and might be appropriate for a scary or warning PSA. But don’t overdo it. Keep in mind that too many dark colors can make your slide hard to read. The best PSAs aren’t always scary or intense. You can choose brighter, happier colors and convey an effective and positive message.

  • Images

What images do you want to use? You might use photographs, illustrations, charts, graphs, or diagrams. You might be able to find these online, or you might need to create your own. Remember, you can’t just download photos from the Internet without permission. You need to find free photos from a safe location, like:

Text

What text do you want to use? Remember that the audience will be hearing your group’s narration as they look at the slide. You don’t want them to get confused by trying to read and listen to a lot of text at the same time. But there are some pieces of information that should be printed as well as spoken.

Important facts, places to go to get more information, or anything that you really want to emphasize to your audience―that information should go on your slide as well as in your script.

Audio Technician

You group’s PSA will have a recorded audio element. In this activity you will learn how to record using a specified program. 

 Open a practice presentation and follow the steps in the online instructions to make an audio for the presentation. Use a chart like the one below to take notes on important steps you need to remember. If there is a step that is confusing to you, make a note about questions you want to ask your teacher. You may also want to get help from the audio technicians in other groups.

Remember, it is your responsibility to lead your group in this important aspect of your project. Use this time to make sure that you understand how to correctly record, save, and make changes to the audio.

 Script Writer 

  • Scriptwriter: writes the script for the PSA, using the outline; makes sure the PSA is the correct length

 

Rubric: Multimedia PSA

Name: _____________________________________Date:_____________________ 


 

Exemplary
10 points

 

 Soli
7-9 points

 

Developing
6-4 points

 

 

Needs Attention
4-0 points

 

 

Visual Design

 

 

PSA is attractive, excellent visual design, and professional, and organized.

 

Excellent graphics are utilized to support the content and make it flow easy

 

 

PSA has basic attractiveness and has a good visual design with an organized layout.

 

Good graphics help support the content.

 

 

PSA has limited appeal missing some visual design and poorly organized

 

Too many or too few graphics are used and lack support of the content.

 

 

PSA is messy, contains poor design, not organized

 

Graphics are not present at all or if present, distract from the content

 

 

Expressiveness

 

 

PSA is extremely creative, engaging, and informative and highly likely to be appreciated by the target audience.

 

 

PSA is somewhat creative, engaging, and informative and likely to be appreciated by the target audience.

 

 

PSA is poorly creative, engaging, or informative, or it is unlikely to appeal to the target audience.

 

 

PSA is not at all engaging, creative, nformative or will not be appreciated by the target audience.

 

 

Comprehension of

Subject Matter

 

 

All content is accurate and complete according to directions and communicates a complete understanding of the topic.

 

 

Most of the content is accurate and followed most directions according to instructions shows mastery of the topic.

 

 

Content shows some flaws and has omissions related to instructions illustrates partial knowledge of the topic.

 

 

Much of the content is inaccurate, confusing, leaving out valuable information according to instructions and communicating very little understanding of the topic.

 

 

Narration

 

 

Narration is highly clear, animated, and spoken at an easily understandable pace.

 

 

Narration is usually clear, animated, and spoken at an understandable pace.

 

 

Narration is unclear or slightly confusing at times, and the pace is either too rushed or too slow at times to be easily understood.

 

 

Narration is unclear or delivered without enthusiasm, or pace is too fast to be understood.

 

 

Call to ACTION

 

 

 

Exhibits complete and clear call to action pertaining to instructions

 

Exhibits mostly a clear call to action pertaining to instructions

 

 

Exhibits an unclear call to action pertaining to instructions

 

Exhibits a lack of call to action pertaining to instructions

 

Total Points

50points

&

grading comments

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Honors Project #4: Model & Trifold Poster

  1. Project Description

    You will work with one or two partners (max of 3 per group) to create a model/demonstration and poster that illustrates either a physiological function or how a disease or condition affects a function that you learned about in this class.

    The driving question for the project is: “How can we demonstrate a function in human anatomy and physiology?”

  2. Project components

You will produce two project components:

  • A model or demonstration that illustrates a physiological function you learned about in health Science:
    • Uses inexpensive, common materials that you find at school or around your home
    • May replicate or modify a model or a demonstration that you’ve learned about online, in class, or in a magazine article or a textbook. You may also come up with a totally original idea.
  • A trifold display board (poster) that explains and describes:
    • The anatomy involved in the function
    • How the model shows the function
    • A condition that affects the function, recent findings about the function, or how to take care of the part of your body connected to the function

Component 1:  Model and demonstration

Work independently to research possible models or demonstrations that you would like to create. Your group will choose a project to work on and your teacher will assign you to a group.

As you research projects that interest you, keep these things in mind:

  • Does the project illustrate a function? Is it a function that you have already learned about? For example, a project in which you build a skeleton out of newspaper rolls does not illustrate a function. However, a project in which you demonstrate how different joints work, using newspaper roles, is a function and it is a function you’ve already learned about.
  • Does the project involve inexpensive materials that you can find at home or at school? A project that uses cardboard, sponges, straws, and plastic milk gallons would work. A project that uses expensive lumber, a new circuit board, and special wire sold online would not work.
  • Does the project require originality and effort?Pick something that will impress your audience and show that you understand complex material about the body system your project focuses on. You have time to put together something really interesting, so put some effort into it.

     Component 2: Trifold Board

  • Your trifold display board (poster) will be divided into the following three sections: 

  • Section 1: A scientific explanation and description of the anatomy involved in the function (and condition, if it is applicable to your project) 
  • Section 2: An explanation of how the model or demonstration illustrates the function (and condition)
  • Section 3: One or more of the following topics:
    • A description of a condition or conditions that affect the function (Do not choose this topic if your model already demonstrates how a function is affected by a condition or disease.)
    • Recent findings about the function
    • How to take care of your body to protect the function

If there are three people in your group, each person will be responsible for one section. If there are two people, each person will be responsible for one section, and you should split the work for the remaining section. Work as a group to decide which topic or topics you will focus on in Section 3. Then decide who is going to be responsible for which sections.

Remember to keep track of the sources you use for pictures and information. Write down all of the information you will need in order to cite your resources properly on the back of the Trifold

As you work, keep track of illustrations, photos, charts, or other graphics that you may want to use on your display board (poster).

Rubric: Model or Demonstration

Student   Names:                                                                           Date:                            

 

Exemplary 10

Solid 9-7

Developing 6-5

Needs Attention 4-0

Engagement with Audience

Presenters are animated, easy to understand, and convey enthusiasm to their audience.

Presenters are animated with one or two lapses in understandability but convey enthusiasm to their audience.

One or more presenters are shy or mumble so that understanding is problematic. They convey some enthusiasm to their audience.

All presenters fail to speak in an understandable way and do not convey enthusiasm to their audience.

Comprehension of Subject Matter

All content is accurate and complete and communicates a complete understanding of the topic.

Most of the content is accurate and shows mastery of the topic.

Content shows some flaws and omissions and illustrates only partial knowledge of the topic.

Much of the content is inaccurate and confusing and communicates very little understanding of the topic.

Model/Demo Construction

Model or demo is thoughtfully constructed and conveys a clear understanding of a physiological function for a general audience.

Model or demo is adequately constructed and conveys an understanding of a physiological function for a general audience.

Model or demo has some construction flaws but conveys a basic understanding of a physiological function for a general audience.

Model or demo is poorly constructed and does not convey an understanding of a physiological function for a general audience.

Total Points

40 points

&

Additional Comments

 


Rubric: Trifold Display Board Poster

Student   Names:                                                                                       Date:                            

 

Exemplary 10

Solid 9-7

Developing 6-5

Needs Attention 4-0

Visual Design

Assignment is highly attractive, and has excellent design.

Appropriate graphics are used effectively to support the content and make it easy to follow.

Assignment is mostly attractive, and has a good design.

 

Graphics help support the content.

Assignment contains minimal graphics, & good design.

Too many or too few graphics are used and are ineffective in supporting the content.

Assignment is messy and contains no coherent visual design and poor organization.

Graphics are not present at all or, if present, distract from the content.

Research

Research is extremely thorough and current.

Information is used effectively and cited properly.

Research is good and provides sufficient information on the topic.

Proper citations are used for each source.

Minimal research was done to generate information on the topic.

Some source information is missing and/or is not in the proper format.

Little to no research is evident

No source information is collected or presented.

Comprehension of Subject Matter

All content is accurate & complete according to directions

Most of the content is accurate & complete according to directions

Content shows some flaws and some omissions according to directions

Much of the content is inaccurate and confusing and communicates very little understanding of the topic. Directions not followed

Content Organization/ Flow

Content is clearly organized, with informative headings and a logical flow of ideas

Content is mostly organized, headings give a sense of the content, and ideas somewhat flow logically

Content is disorganized; headings are lacking or don’t convey what will be covered. Ideas are often disconnected.

Content is extremely disorganized.

Headings don’t convey what the topic is about or are missing. There is no connection between ideas.

Mechanics

No grammatical, spelling, or punctuation errors. All sentences are well constructed.

Few grammatical, spelling, or punctuation errors. Most sentences are well constructed.

Some grammatical, spelling, or punctuation errors. Most sentences are well constructed.

Many grammatical, spelling, or punctuation errors. Most sentences are poorly constructed.

Total Points

50 points

Additional Comments

 






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